The Universe

Every night I try to make it a point to look up at the sky and gaze at the stars. Of course I can’t do this on cloudy nights, but my favourite nights are warm summer ones when they’re at their brightest.

How amazing is it that we are looking back in time when we look into the sky? Every single star has it’s own story, it’s own surface that is yet to be explored by mankind. Looking at the stars always makes me feel like I’m so small, and it’s a very humbling feeling. You realize that you are only one small, tiny part of our great universe, barely having any effect at all. You realize that your problems are so insignificant compared to how big and wide our world really is. We don’t even completely know how large the universe really is, it goes on forever as far as we know. It’s so hard to wrap our heads around the idea of infinity, the fact that the universe might not have an end is so mind-boggling in its complexity that I feel as though my head may implode whenever I think about it.

The universe is so complicated in its fabric, it’s an intricately woven tapestry that hangs over us. I hope that mankind will always be striving to unearth its secrets, and explore further and further as our technology gets more advanced. We can’t be naive in thinking that we’re the only intelligent forms of life out there, maybe one day our descendants will bridge the gap between our world and others.

So every clear night, I gaze at the stars, hoping that someone or something out there is looking right back at us. I admire the patterns of the constellations, and hope to learn all the stories that they tell. I want to map out the path of the stars as they move positions and watch the planets enter their most visible times. The stars are truly the most beautiful thing I’ve ever laid eyes on, and I hope that they don’t fade out in my lifetime.

Wild animals belong in the wild

Yesterday I saw a documentary called Blackfish, about the treatment of killer whales in captivity back in the 90s. I enjoyed the film, definitely understand why it’s critically acclaimed. It’s the kind of thing that really gets your stomach in a knot knowing what’s going on with those animals out there. Creatures like Harambe or the whales in Blackfish are raised in captivity, not being allowed to experience true freedom like they’re meant to. It’s not natural for us to hold animals in tanks and cages and stare at them for our pleasure. I am ashamed to say that I have been to zoo’s and aquariums, recently even, and perpetuate the normality of seeing wild animals tamed and confined within walls. It terrifies me to even think about being in their position, to be captured as an infant and raised among strangers, then being fed only after performing tricks to please an audience several times a day. It’s inhumane. The whales in Blackfish were volatile and rightfully so. Animals live by their primal instincts, we can’t talk to or completely understand them. As much as we like to argue otherwise, they’re unpredictable. We like to believe that we can communicate with animals, that we understand their wants and needs and form a bond with them. In some ways we can, with domesticated creatures like dogs and cats. But for wild animals like killer whales and gorillas, mankind hasn’t progressed enough for us to know what these beasts are thinking (and to be honest, we don’t deserve to). They are highly intelligent and have incredible emotional capabilities, but they still can kill us at the snap of a finger whether they are provoked or not. We need to stop hunting elephants for their tusks, that ivory doesn’t belong to us. Stop hunting seals for sport, stop killing lions to show off to your rich friends, stop separating baby whales from their mothers. Stop bleeding the world dry to make a profit.

 

Island – Daily Post writing prompt, July 3rd